How to get started in Teaching English as a Foreign Language

I’ve been talking to many people about how to best get started in Teaching English as a Foreign Language (TEFL). For many, just thinking about travelling abroad, and working and living in a different country, is a bit intimidating.

It’s not only the idea of teaching in front of a foreign class of students that a bit scary, it’s also about saying goodbye to the familiar environment, working and living in an unfamiliar country, and getting used to a new culture and language.  But if you feel confident and have enough knowledge of English language, being the TEFL teacher is a great career.
When I think back some twenty years ago, I remember my own fears and that I nearly missed my plane when I traveled to my first job as a TEFL teacher in the hills of northern Greece.

Resources

Get your GED® and teach abroad  -Check these fast pace programs from Covcell GED prep
TESO Certifications (American TESOL Institute) – For the full article click here
Qualifications to teach English (Trinity College London) – Read more here

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Bilingual Education Benefits

 

In the United States, most politicized discussions of bilingual education policy have focused on language minority children. Frequently, their backgrounds in languages other than English are assumed to be the cause of their educational deficiencies. Title VII policies were largely predicated on this view, even though advocates of bilingual education tend to see minority languages as personal and societal resources rather than as detriments.

At best, the deficit view has tended to result in policies aimed only at accommodating children from home backgrounds in which languages other than English were spoken and lower expectations for their academic achievement were accepted. Under the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) of 2001, there has been much fanfare regarding the need to promote higher expectations for all children.

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Be Your Own Instructor, Become Fluent In French, And Teach TEFL

Learning a foreign language can take a lifetime. Even if you lived in a country in which a foreign language was spoken it would still take you many years to fully understand the slang, jokes, and cultural differences. Even still, it is possible to learn a new language if you are willing to put in the effort.

First, look for a course that will help you to learn French online. Because it is easy to find free online resources that are both comprehensive and up to date, you can plan out your course of study quickly. In some cases, it may be a good idea to work with a native French instructor, however, you can still get a basic understanding on your own.

If you want to learn French quickly then it is best to speak it with other people that are learning. You can carry on casual conversations that will help you to challenge yourself. Using visual aids that will help you to trigger your memory will also assist you when you are unable to think of a particular word or phrase. As long as you are open to the idea of trying out different methods you will find that learning French is a joy and not a burden.

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Advantages Of Learning A Foreign Language

With the continuing globalization, our world is coming closer every day. Quite a few nations across the world are becoming more connected every day and they depend on each other more and more. Consequently, it has become imperative to learn the language of one another.

This is so as connections are depending on interactions and interactions are demanding communication and communication is only possible by means of language. Therefore, getting to know each other’s languages is a necessary step if we want to develop relationships.

This not only makes you a highly valuable asset for the country but it also proffers countless perks to you as a person. So, in case of the dilemma of whether you should learn to speak and write a new language, absolutely go for it.

Realizing the importance of multi-lingual competencies, many countries have taken concrete steps towards that goal. At present, there are numerous educational institutions that proffer foreign language programs. This is also the case in America, where practically all top colleges and universities offer a number of language courses to their students.

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What Does it Take to get a Masters in Special Education?

Special education is a broad discipline in the teaching profession that caters to the individual differences of students with all kinds of special needs, including autism, communication difficulties, developmental disorders, learning difficulties, emotional disorders, and physical disabilities.

What Does a Masters in Special Education Involve?

Teachers working in special education programs are usually required to have a Masters in Special Education. Such programs demand a great deal of hard work and dedication in order to be successfully completed so a student should be fairly certain in their minds that Special Education is the right teaching discipline for them before beginning a Masters Degree in Special Education at any school.

Students on their way to a Masters in Special Education have a huge range of subjects to cover in two years or so. Students majoring in special education dedicate themselves to learning about the nature of disabilities and the ways in which individuals who are classified as special needs and their families are affected on an everyday basis. Only when they understand those issues can they then go on and develop the skills and techniques they will need to educate these individuals effectively.

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How to teach learners with special needs

I am a physically disabled person. I have cerebral palsy and I am a wheelchair user. I graduated in English four years ago and when I entered college my idea was to work as a translator.

However, after some time I realized I did not fit in the profession. Therefore, I decided to become a teacher, in spite of all the difficulties I would have to overcome.

I have just started my career as an EFL teacher and in this article, I intend to share with you the challenges I faced in my first experience as a teacher. I additionally do some interesting work for students who follow an online course with Covcell.com to get their high school equivalency diploma, a job that suits me pretty well.

How I got the job

A friend of mine called and asked me if I would like to teach Basic English to a group of about 15 physically challenged learners at the Association for the disabled in Curitiba.

The aim of the course was to increase the students’ chances of getting better jobs. This project was sponsored by state government funds; the learners didn’t have to pay for the course and the course books were included. I liked the idea very much and accepted the job. Continue reading

Moving and A New Job – TEFL!

I want to give a quick update for those of you asking how things are going. In short, they are going near perfectly. We are moving into my husband’s grandma’s house that has been empty for four years.

We’ve been doing some major cleaning and organizing (while doing Vacation Bible School every night this week) and now it’s time to move all the stuff in. Tomorrow will be an all-out blitz of carpet cleaning and furniture moving. I expect me and the hubby will be dog tired tomorrow night, but at least we’ll be in our house.

I know our presence in the saint of a mother-in-law’s house has been stressful. She’s organized and likes a clean house. Enter 7 dispossessed slobs with all their donated clothes and stuff in boxes and bags and a few random suitcases. It’s not pretty. I know she’s not freaking out about it or anything, but I still feel a little guilty about it.

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Evolution of a Teacher’s Toolbox

 

The recent  TEFL Teachers’ Conference was an inspiring experience, now I’ve had time to reflect, these are my own personal highlights from what I learned.  As with any event, each person will take away their own snapshots and apply it to their own understanding and situation.

These are very personal reflections and I will try to refer to sources wherever possible – and apologize in advance if I portray what was said in a different way to how it was intended or if I get my references wrong.

There were 2 stand-out keynote speakers for me – lots of other very interesting keynotes too, but these were my learning highlights of the week. Listening to Professor Sugata Mitra talking about his Hole in the Wall project was thought-provoking, humbling and puts teachers in their place by putting children in theirs – in control of their learning.

Just take a look at this video where Professor Sugata Mitra speaks on another occasion, but similar to the EFL conference:

David Rogers reflected on this approach to teaching in his recent blog post here.  Like David, I found this approach by accident, when trying out new tools with the children and finding that sometimes when I take a step back, then they learn even more than when I am controlling every step of their learning experience!

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Online Tools Review of StudySpider

There is a neat, new free service on the market right now aimed at both students and teachers. This cool new study notes online tool features a revolutionary system that allows you to easily upload all of your study notes or lessons plans, and store them online. The system immediately goes to work creating a searchable database of all of your notes, featuring note pages with automatically generated links to other relevant pages of notes you have.

Essentially they build a cool website out for your notes that looks and feels a lot like Wikipedia – but it’s all about your notes. It does not end there. StudyUp allows you to network with other students studying similar subjects or topics. The StudyUp “StudySpider” scans your notes and cross references your information with all notes in the StudyUp database. Recommendations are then made to the user for networking opportunities.

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Vocabulary and its retention

Recent articles in Issues  have dedicated much attention to vocabulary and its retention. In this article, I would like to propose an approach for specialized word/term retention in teaching ESP which has proved to be highly effective with my tertiary social sciences students.

A tendency for more narrowly tailored courses in adult English teaching has recently been observed and was forecast as a prominent new millennium ELT issue by Dave Allan : ‘There will be increased demand for specialist Englishes’, i.e. ESP.

Language teaching, on the whole, and ESP in particular, has always been characterized by the use of methods that enable learners to acquire a sufficient amount of vocabulary, called a ‘working’ vocabulary. ‘Words are the basis of language, and thus the basis of communication’

But probably all foreign language teachers are aware of frustration when in an impromptu speech our students use more primitive words than we have just taught them. What should we do, in making a word pass from receptive to productive level and, at the same time, in fostering all other communicative language skills? Continue reading

What is TESOL-TEFL and why it matters

The School for International Training (S.I.T.) offers a 130-hour TESOL course taught by individuals trained by the prestigious university. The course provides participants with an opportunity to develop new skills with the help of experts in the exciting and growing field of TESOL-TEFL.

TESOL stands for: Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages
TEFL is short for: Teaching English as a Foreign Language

The innovative course curriculum was designed by S.I.T. faculty, based on humanistic, experiential and progressive teaching methods. The course provides practical training through teaching demonstrations, lesson planning & analysis, practice teaching, and feedback. Participants develop skills in teaching, speaking, listening, reading, writing, grammar and culture.

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